Caledonian Crows « lancalass

My Sister Pauline, called Home Too Soon.

If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane , I would walk right up to heaven and bring you back again.

The greatest gift our parents gave us..was each other.

If I had a flower for every memory I have with you, I could forever walk in my garden.

Rest In Peace knowing how much I love you!!

All I ask is that you remember me at the alter of God.

A sundown splendid and serene,
A sister’s kiss upon your cheek,
A timeless moment when you are thanked,
You smile but cannot speak.
Such gifts are rich beyond compare,
And compensate for grief and care.
We lost a very special sister and best friend the day you were called home so suddenly and without warning..
Loved with a love beyond all telling,
Missed with a grief beyond all tears.
Goodnight and God Bless Pauline I love you and miss you so much…xxx

Re-united with her loving parents and brothers Peter and John, sister Patrica. Missed by her loving husband Peter also daughter Susan and Ebony her granddaughter,  son Anthony, and Grandsons.. Not forgetting son – in – law Brian and Granddaughter Julie.

All of you Rest In Peace!

 

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Caledonian Crows

Tool-making crows have allowed us to see the first foundations of a technological breakthrough.

New Caledonian crows spontaneously make hooks out of plant material, using them to “fish” for grubs and spiders.

Experiments have now revealed that these hooked tools are 10 times faster at retrieving a snack than the alternative tool – a simple twig.

Measuring the hooks’ effectiveness tells scientists something about what drove this tool-use to evolve.

Beyond that, the scientists say the insight has provided them a first glimpse of the “evolution of a new technology” in the animal kingdom.

The findings are published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

These crows are the only animals known to make hooks.

The earliest human-made fishing hooks – from about 23,000 ago – were one of the most significant technological milestones.

The archaeologists, who unearthed these seashell-carved hooks in a cave on the Japanese island of Okinawa, said this early “maritime technology” had allowed>>

CREDIT: Victoria Gill, BBC SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT

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