Blackburn Rovers Great Barrier Reef « lancalass

My Sister Pauline, called Home Too Soon.

If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane , I would walk right up to heaven and bring you back again.

The greatest gift our parents gave us..was each other.

If I had a flower for every memory I have with you, I could forever walk in my garden.

Rest In Peace knowing how much I love you!!

All I ask is that you remember me at the alter of God.

A sundown splendid and serene,
A sister’s kiss upon your cheek,
A timeless moment when you are thanked,
You smile but cannot speak.
Such gifts are rich beyond compare,
And compensate for grief and care.
We lost a very special sister and best friend the day you were called home so suddenly and without warning..
Loved with a love beyond all telling,
Missed with a grief beyond all tears.
Goodnight and God Bless Pauline I love you and miss you so much…xxx

Re-united with her loving parents and brothers Peter and John, sister Patrica. Missed by her loving husband Peter also daughter Susan and Ebony her granddaughter,  son Anthony, and Grandsons.. Not forgetting son – in – law Brian and Granddaughter Julie.

All of you Rest In Peace!

 

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Great Barrier Reef

No one would challenge the majesty of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

Nearly 1,500 miles long, the reef is alight with a kaleidoscope of vivid colours. It’s home to roughly 9,000 species of fish, molluscs, whales and other creatures.

In 1981, the reef was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a status that helps it draw 2 million visitors a year.

It’s also dying. At our own hands.

Two major bleaching events have wracked the Great Barrier Reef over the last two years, leaving chunks of it dead. Bleachings happen when the coral expels tiny algae, called zooxanthellae, that live inside it and provide its food and create its rainbow hues. Without zooxanthellae, the reef’s tissue turns transparent and the coral starves.

Global warming, fueled by our reliance on petroleum and coal, has pushed ocean temperatures 0.68 Celsius over the past century. That might not seem like much, but it’s enough to prompt the coral and algae to abandon their symbiotic relationship. While coral doesn’t die immediately, the bleachings have been intense enough to kill huge swaths of>>

CREDIT: MICHELLE STARR, DANIEL VAN BOOM, CNN NEWS

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